Health

Late-stage breast cancer more prevalent in black women than white: study

Late-stage breast cancer more prevalent in black women than white: study

The advanced stage of the deadly disease of breast cancer is more prevalent among black/African and Caribbean women than white breast cancer patients in England, a new study by Cancer Research UK and Public Health England revealed.

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H5N8 bird flu kills 1,500 birds on Israeli farm: OIE

H5N8 bird flu kills 1,500 birds on Israeli farm: OIE

An outbreak of highly infectious H5N8 bird flu virus on an Israeli farm has already killed more than 1,500 birds, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) warned on Monday.

The deadly outbreak occurred at Hefzi-Bah in the northern district of Hazafon. The farm hit by the outbreak had 35,500 birds before being hit by the virus which spread through contact with wild birds that recently migrated from Europe.

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Introduce peanuts to infants early to prevent allergies: study suggests

Introduce peanuts to infants early to prevent allergies: study suggests

Introducing peanuts to infants early, between four to six months of age, reduces the chance that the kids will develop peanut allergies, a new study suggested.

Pediatrician Matthew Greenhawt, of the Food Challenge & Research Unit at Children's Hospital Colorado, said that peanuts should be introduced early in life to infants, after some other foods have been introduced. The timing as well as method should depend on the child's risk of a peanut allergy.

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Studies offer contradictory answers to ‘lazy eye’ question

Studies offer contradictory answers to ‘lazy eye’ question

Two new studies have offered contradictory answers to the question as to whether playing video games on a tablet PC work better than typical eye-patching for improving vision in kids with amblyopia or lazy eye.

In one of the two studies, researchers found that standard eye-patching works better in improving vision in kids with lazy eye. But, the other study suggested that computer gaming outperforms standard treatment.

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Trump’s win could jeopardize cannabis reform movement

Trump’s win could jeopardize cannabis reform movement

The shocking victory of Donald Trump in the hotly contested presidential race could jeopardize the cannabis reform movement that aims legalization of marijuana for medical as well as recreational purposes.

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Seasonal depression can be treated with medication and psychotherapy

Seasonal depression can be treated with medication and psychotherapy

Just like regular depression, a seasonal depression known as seasonal affective disorder (SAD) can be treated effectively with medication and psychotherapy, health experts say.

While decline in temperatures and duration of days during the winter season brings in winter blues for many, some fall in the grip of SAD, which is a subset of depression, and not a separate mood disorder.

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Fumes emitted by phone charger sicken 7 people at Boston school

Fumes emitted by phone charger sicken 7 people at Boston school

Seven people, including six adults and one child, were rushed to a hospital after a phone charger emitted hazardous fumes at a school in Boston, authorities confirmed.

The Boston Fire Department confirmed that crews responded to the incident at the Manville School in Mission Hill, after being reported that that a number of people got sick after inhaling fumes.

School officials told reported that someone poured water on a small phone charger that had overheated. Soon after being poured with water,, the charger emitted fumes that sickened several people, including a student.

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War Metaphors for Alzheimer’s may do more harm than good: researchers say

War Metaphors for Alzheimer’s may do more harm than good: researchers say

Using war metaphors for conditions like Alzheimer's disease may do more harm than good, a team of researchers led by Daniel R. George of Penn State College of Medicine cautioned. 

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Too much heat in kitchen increases risk of heart disease: researchers find

Too much heat in kitchen increases risk of heart disease: researchers find

It may be the temperature at which food is cooked, rather than the amount of oil, which may be causing heart disease, a new study published in the journal "Nutrition" suggested.

A team of researchers led by Prof. Raj Bhopal, of public health at University of Edinburgh, found that foods release certain harmful chemicals called neo-formed contaminants (NFCs) when they are cooked at high temperatures.

NFCs include trans-fatty acids or trans-fats that can increase the risk of heart disease. These fats are produced when a food is cooked at a high temperature.

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Additional hour of sleep can disrupt normal sleep patterns

Additional hour of sleep can disrupt normal sleep patterns

Americans will need to set back their clocks by one hour this Sunday as daylight saving time comes to an end, allowing people to have an additional hour of sleep.

While an additional hour of sleep will be a much-awaited respite for many individuals, some health experts have cautioned that it can disrupt normal sleep patterns, putting an unprecedented strain on the body.

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