Research

Researchers struggling to determine whether marijuana can treat MS symptoms

Researchers struggling to determine whether marijuana can treat MS symptoms

In a bid to determine whether marijuana can really treat MS symptoms, researchers at Colorado State University’s Integrative Neurophysiology Laboratory are studying individuals with MS who are already using the drug as a treatment.

Though a number of anecdotal reports have claimed that medical marijuana can effectively treat MS symptoms like muscle weakness, anxiety and fatigue, they haven’t been scientifically verified.

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Researchers detect Lyme disease with wearable sensors

Researchers detect Lyme disease with wearable sensors

A news research conducted by a tem of experts from Stanford University showed that smart watches along with some other personal biosensor devices may help detect the Lyme disease, which is carried by infected ticks.

During the two-year study, the researchers looked at five dozen individuals, who were asked to wear several devices. The wearable devices gathered a broad-ranging amount of information about the participating individuals, including their heart rates, blood oxygen levels and skin temperature.

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IVG can pose significant ethical dilemmas: researchers warn

IVG can pose significant ethical dilemmas: researchers warn

While fertility experts and many couples are excited about a new technique that could allow doctors to create sperm and egg cells in a lab dish, some are arguing that it will pose significant ethical dilemmas.

The controversial technique, referred to as "in vitro gametogenesis (IVG)," can certainly help a lot in treating infertility, but it could also result in "embryo farming" and a craze for having "designer" babies.

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Researchers find no link between joint pain and weather

Researchers find no link between joint pain and weather

People often blame weather for symptoms associated with back pain or achy joints, but a new study has suggested that weather plays no part in symptoms associated such aches.

The new study, conducted by the George Institute for Global Health, refuted the widely established thought that changes in the weather, including temperature, pressure of air and humidity, trigger episodes of back pain and arthritis.

Prof. Chris Maher, who led the study, said that the belief that cold weather triggers episodes of back pain and arthritis is not based on facts.

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Zika isn’t as deadly as many believe: expert says

Zika isn’t as deadly as many believe: expert says

The devastating Zika epidemic gained global attention in the last couple of years, but it in most cases it is actually a mild illness symptoms similar to that of common cold.

Participating in the First Friday talk held at The Cedars, Dr. Jonathan Frye, a renowned ecologist and natural science professor at Mac College, gave a presentation titled “The Epidemic Spread of the Zika Virus,” and spoke about various dangers, misnomers and myths about the virus.

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Study explains how humans’ ability to recognize faces gets better in young adults

Study explains how humans’ ability to recognize faces gets better in young adults

A new study by Stanford University researchers claimed to have found why humans’ ability to recognize faces keeps getting better until around the age of 30 years.

A team of researchers led by Jesse Gomez, a graduate student in neurosciences at Stanford, carried out a comparison of children’s brains and grownup brains. The brain scans of 22 children and 25 adults revealed that an area of the brain that recognizes faces keeps growing long after adolescence.

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Vitamin D deficiency raises risk of chronic headache: study

Vitamin D deficiency raises risk of chronic headache: study

A new study conducted by researchers from the University of Eastern Finland has warned that deficiency of vitamin D could significantly increase the risk of chronic headaches in men.

The researchers studied data on a total of 2601 men aged between 42 and 60 years who were participating in the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study (KIHD), and found that those who had low levels of vitamin D were suffering chronic headaches more frequently in comparison to those who had higher vitamin D levels.

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Spending an hour a day on social media can affect kids’ happiness: study

Spending an hour a day on social media can affect kids’ happiness: study

Children who spend merely an hour each day on social media may actually feel less satisfied with their lives, a new study published by the IZA Institute of Labor Economics suggested.

Teenagers can often be seen obsessively checking their feeds on various social media sites on their mobile devices. But, researchers found that behind their smiling selfies, teenagers mightn’t be as happy as they try to show in the photos.

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Financial penalties reduce hospital readmission rates among Medicare patients

Financial penalties reduce hospital readmission rates among Medicare patients

Financial penalties effectively reduced thirty-day hospital readmission rates among Medicare beneficiaries with common conditions, according to a report published the medical journal Annals of Internal Medicine.

As per the report, the passage of the ACA’s Hospital Readmission Reduction Program (HRRP) reduced 30-day risk-standardized readmission rates among Medicare patients with conditions like pneumonia, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and heart failure.

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Female doctors provide better treatment than male counterparts: study finds

Female doctors provide better treatment than male counterparts: study finds

Female physicians are better than their male counterparts at treating patients in hospitals and keeping them healthy for a long term, according to a new research.

Harvard researchers analyzed a random sample of Medicare patients hospitalized and treated by general internists from Jan. 2011 through Dec. 2014. A scrutiny of over 1.5 million hospitalizations, the researchers discovered that those treated by male doctors had higher mortality rate.

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