Arthritis and Lupus Drugs Pulled Off by Pharma Companies

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Arthritis and Lupus Drugs Pulled Off by Pharma Companies

Following many deaths, rheumatoid arthritis and lupus drugs are being pulled off by Swiss pharmaceutical companies Roche and Biogen. After being observed by monitoring board, the two drugs were found to be immensely infectious and even deadly in some cases.

Ocrelizumab is still reportedly being tested for people who suffer from relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. The expected sale of 800 million francs is therefore being denied by Roche. Zurich exchange reported a dip of 0.6% at 179.60 Swiss francs in sales of Roche.

Roche had said that before the drug was proved to be causing some serious infections, earlier last year, at the last stage of its trail, was confirmed that it had a powerful impact on curbing the effect of rheumatoid arthritis.

Roche cited a review which said, "The safety risk outweighs the benefits observed in these specific patient populations at this time after detecting serious and opportunistic infections, some of which were fatal".

National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society states that Rheumatoid arthritis is detected in 20 million people and results in stiff, swollen and painful joints after inflation caused by deficiency of immunity.


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