Shipping Company UPS Inclines Following 1Q Positive Outlook


Shipping Company UPS Inclines Following 1Q Positive Outlook

Due to the optimistic outlook for the year ahead and the hopeful results of first quarter, the shares of UPS Inc. (United Parcel Service Inc.) the largest shipping company inclined in the premarket trading on Thursday.

It was stated that the full year gains were also projected positive because the company is shipping more packages internationally and that per package gains were also rising in the U. S. The shipping company has also predicted that the forwarding and logistics businesses will also witness growth.

It was disclosed by the UPS, late Wednesday that the first quarter per share profit for the company increased 33%. The complete results for the three months performance will be presented by the Atlanta based company on April

As compared to the earlier forecast of $2.70 to $3.05, the company is now hoping for full-year earnings of $3.05 to $3.30 per share.

However according to the analysts' prediction per share earnings were expected to be 57 cents per share averagely, stated Thomson Reuters. According to Edward Jones an analyst opined that results mirror the reviving global economy at its best in Asia and Latin America.

Latest News

NextEra Agrees to Sell Two Texas Power Plants to Luminant
China’s Yuan Could be Named a Reserve Currency by the IMF
Rupert Murdoch Tweets Tribune Probably Selling Los Angeles Times
Black Friday Shopping “Uninspiring” in Brick and Mortar Stores; Shopping Trends
U.S. Crude Drops Further Due to Surplus Supply
CVC and CPPIB Outbid Others for a Possible Deal to Buy Petco for $4.7 Billion
US Government All Set to Introduce a New Law for Americans “Seriously Delinquent
Reportedly Pfizer Plans to Acquire Allergan in a Deal of $150 Billion or More
In October Most States Experienced a Drop in Unemployment Rate
San Francisco Fed President John Williams sees a “Strong Case” for an Interest
Cincinnati Shoppers have More Choice of Local Black Friday Deals this Year
Sliding Crude Prices Continue Giving the U.S Oil Producers Reasons to Cut Costs