New Zealand Retails Synthetic Urine to Pass in Workplace Drug Tests

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New Zealand Retails Synthetic Urine to Pass in Workplace Drug Tests

On Wednesday, it was accounted that in order to assist people in passing workplace drug examinations for substances like cannabis and ecstasy, New Zealand sellers are retailing synthetic urine.

The New Zealand Herald newspaper revealed that the chemical composition of the artificial urine is same as the real urine, which lets the employees beat drug tests that are forced by the bosses.

Chris Fowlie is the proprietor of an Auckland shop known as Hempstore, which deals in the product. He feels that the drug returns the employees with their privacy. Fowlie told the newspaper, "Random drug testing goes against the Bill of Rights and the Privacy Act and violates the natural justice of presumption of innocence".

The website of Hempstore proffers a product dubbed "Quick Fix", which is a pre-mixed fake urine. It is believed that it has a 100% success rate in New Zealand drug tests.

Scientist Paul Fitzmaurice, from the Government's Environmental Science and Research department, said that it is hard to make out the difference between the synthetic urine and the natural one. However, it doesn’t smell like the real product.

According to the labor department, in New Zealand workplace drug tests are restricted to instances where the abuse of the substance would lead to a safety problem.


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