Rasmussen Reports poll: Only about 21% Americans want Internet to be regulated like TV

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Internet to be regulated like TV

According to new “Net Neutrality” related poll by the Rasmussen Reports group, US voters have expressed reluctance about the prospect of regulation of the Internet in the same way as the regulation for television and radio.

The Rasmussen Reports’ survey, based on the telephonic poll of 1,000 “likely voters,” found that “American voters believe free market competition will protect Internet users more than government regulation and fear that regulation will be used to push a political agenda.”

The poll, which was taken shortly after the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted in favor of the “net neutrality” on Tuesday, found that only about 21 percent of the likely US voters – one in every five - want the FCC to regulate the Internet. While more than half of voters expressed resistance to such the open Internet regulations, 25 percent voters are still undecided.

Specifically speaking, 56 percent voters said that, in their view, the FCC “would use its regulatory authority to promote a political agenda”; and 52 percent voters said that they preferred “more free market competition” instead of “government regulation” for regulating the Internet.

As per the findings of the Rasmussen survey, Republicans as well as unaffiliated voters overpoweringly resist the FCC’s “regulation of the Internet”; while Democrats are somewhat uniformly divided. Among those who expressed reluctance about the FCC regulations, the ones who use the Internet were the most disinclined.


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