Researcher Questions HIV Theories

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Researcher Questions HIV Theories

There have been a lot of studies that have gone into the study of HIV AIDS, but still there is no viable cure coming out of these studies. It is one of the leading killer diseases that have engulfed the whole globe. There are many people suffering from the disease, thereby resulting in millions of deaths each year.

Now, a researcher at University of Adelaide researcher, Jack da Silva, has claimed that as there are not much known facts in the evolution of HIV, most of the cures for AIDs have failed. Using his computer simulations he discovered that even in the early stages when the population of the virus is low, HIV evolves at a rapid rate, affecting the immune system. The findings have been published in the genetics journal.

There is a general wisdom that that at low population levels, viruses have a reduced genetic evolution which makes them harder to grow rapidly. But in reality, the facts are that no matter what the condition is the growth is very rapid. There are also insights that have come out this study that some genetic mechanism enable the virus to grow so rapidly that it sidesteps all the treatments we throw at it.


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