Women Bodies still strangulated Under Weighty Issues

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Women Bodies still strangulated Under Weighty Issues

Women’s bodies are still defined as per their weight. Confirmation of the given statement can be done by citing an example in which model Melanie Ward was termed as fat irrespective of the fact that she was perfectly normal according to her height.

University of NSW media professor Catharine Lumby said that same issue does not arise when it comes to men and it can be seen when similar pictures of Robert Sheahan were appreciated by online users. Moreover, the users condemned the experts, who called him fat. Online users said that he is perfectly normal.

"Women's bodies in our society still drag a huge cultural weight behind them. Not just a physical weight, but a cultural weight”, said Lumby. He affirmed that men think a lot of things before they rate a woman. Some of the things being thought by them are whether woman is sexy, old, married, having children, weight and age.

However, nothing of such sort exists for men. They are weighed on a completely different scale such as power, wealth and status. Lumby quipped that for men, looks do not matter and what matters is their money and on the other hand, for women it is all about beauty.


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