Researchers Unveil Blood Test to Alert Memory Loss in Aged Women

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Researchers Unveil Blood Test to Alert Memory Loss in Aged Women

A recent news indicate that there are fair chances that blood extracted from postmenopausal women may be able to reflect chances of risk attached with minor brain damage, namely white matter hyperintensities (WMH).

It has been found during a prospective observational study, that those women who were discovered to have a higher level of thrombogenic microvesicles in initial stages, had more chances of large amount of WMH some four years after.

It has been also said by Kejal Kantarci, MD, of the Mayo Clinic in Minneapolis, who is leading the research, that those having high white matter hyperintensities (WMH), are most likely to suffer from memory loss and may face escalates risk of stroke too.

"Preventing the platelets from developing these microvesicles could be a way to stop the progression of white matter hyperintensities in the brain", said Kantarci, in the Feb. 13 issue of Neurology.

For the research, menopausal women part of a randomized trial of hormone therapy, were taken into consideration, and further MRI was used to track down changes observed in WMH before randomization and then at randomization.

However, there are chances that there could be some hidden mechanisms, such as genetic variation, which have some role to play in the development of WMH.


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