Zika isn’t as deadly as many believe: expert says

Zika isn’t as deadly as many believe: expert says

The devastating Zika epidemic gained global attention in the last couple of years, but it in most cases it is actually a mild illness symptoms similar to that of common cold.

Participating in the First Friday talk held at The Cedars, Dr. Jonathan Frye, a renowned ecologist and natural science professor at Mac College, gave a presentation titled “The Epidemic Spread of the Zika Virus,” and spoke about various dangers, misnomers and myths about the virus.

Frye said Zika might have reached epidemic levels, but it isn’t typically deadly. Symptoms are hardly ever severe enough to require hospitalization, and Zika-related deaths are very rare. It is related to diseases like yellow fever, dengue and West Nile.

Speaking on the topic, he added, “There’s this whole family of diseases caused by a family of viruses. They share some common features, but have slight differences in how they work. It was not an epidemic at first, because there were so few cases.”

Zika virus was named after Uganda’s Zika forest, where it was first detected among monkeys in the late 1940s. The first case of Zika illness in humans was reported in 1952 in the African country of Nigeria.

Symptoms of Zika infection include fever, rash, pain in joints, muscle pain, red eyes, headache and fatigue, which usually last a few days to more than a week.

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