Cervical cancer even deadlier to U.S. women than doctors previously thought

Cervical cancer even deadlier to U.S. women than doctors previously thought

The disease of cervical cancer is even deadlier to American women than health experts previously thought, with African-American women being at particularly higher risk, according to a new study.

According to the study, most women get cervical cancer from HPV (human papillomavirus) infection, which is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States. As per an estimate by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDCP), more than 11,000 women in the nation are diagnosed with cervical cancer annually.

Laura Kilpatrick, a cervical cancer survivor, said she was 29 years old and was flying back to her home in Greensboro from her honeymoon when she first realized something went wrong.

Sharing her unpleasant experience, Kilpatrick said, "I was soaked in blood, and a week later, a doctor diagnosed me with cervical caner . I don't think that you can put into words that feeling of what that news is like."

However, there are some ways to avoid the potentially deadly disease, and the Gardasil vaccine is one of them. Doctors recommend boys and girls receive their first three Gardasil shots at age of 11 or 12 years. But, one can receive vaccinate up to age of 26 years.

The alarming findings of the new study were published earlier this week, as January is being observed as the Cervical Cancer Awareness Month.

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